This is the fourth post in our Data Visualization Spotlight series where we showcase how different organizations are using data visualization and analytics to solve their day to day problems.

What started off as a side project in 2001 is today used by more than 5 million people to create, send, and track email newsletters. From one man startups to Fortune 500 companies, about 6 billion emails get sent every month using MailChimp. With a focus on usability and good design, MailChimp is undeniably one of the world’s most popular email marketing service provider. [Related read: How design is playing a strategic role in today's software products?]

MailChimp

In an article published in the MailChimp blog, Ben Chestnut, CEO and Co-Founder, MailChimp says that “Every once in a while a MailChimp customer will ask me, “Hey, MailChimp’s been great for keeping in touch with my loyal customers. But is there any way to buy or rent an email list from you guys, so I can promote my business to potential customers in my area?” That’s when I explain to them the perils of purchased emails, and the virtues of organically growing a permission-based list.”

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This is the third post in our Data Visualization Spotlight series where we showcase how different organizations are using data visualization and analytics to solve their day to day problems.

With several world famous brands like Pampers, Ariel, Gillette and Olay in its kitty, Procter & Gamble touches 4.4 billion people globally. P&G brands are available in more than 180 countries.  As the world’s largest consumer packaged goods company they have a lot of data.

procter and gamble headquarters

To maintain its global leadership status, P&G has to continuously keep a tab on market trends, respond rapidly to them and find new opportunities to improve the lives of its consumers. The ability to analyze this massive amount of data is critical to running the business in real-time and being responsive to changes in the marketplace.

Under its Ex-CEO Bob McDonald, P&G chalked out an agenda to “digitize ” the company’s processes from end to end to make data easily accessible to its decision makers. Business Sufficiency, Business Sphere and Decision Cockpits were the primary enablers of that agenda. Read the rest of this entry »

This is the second post in our Data Visualization Spotlight series where we showcase how different organizations are using data visualization and analytics to solve their day to day problems.

In mid-March 2013, Netflix reported a global streaming subscriber list of 33 million. It increased to 36.3 million (29.2 million in U.S.) in April 2013. It had 40.4 million subscribers (31.2 million in U.S.) in September 2013.  By Q4 2013, it reported 33.1 million subscribers in U.S alone.

Netflix

With its subscriber list growing by leaps and bounds, Netflix faces the daunting task of supporting millions of connected devices spread across 40+ countries. At such a big a scale, it is impossible to manually monitor all that data. Imagine having to detect a system fault in an environment that is not only large and complex but also highly distributed!

To thwart such operational nightmares from occurring, the Netflix team is working on a greenfield project that focuses on building the next generation tools for operational visibility that can proactively detect and communicate system faults and identify areas of improvement.
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This is the fifth and final post in our series ‘Principles of Data Visualization’ #PoDV

In the past few weeks we discussed the goals of data visualization, and how preattentive attributes and analytical patterns enable us to process visual information. However, when designing visualizations we often want to highlight certain aspects of the visual over others. In these cases, Gestalt’s Principles come in handy.

Using the Gestalt Principles to Bring Out Patterns in Visualizations

Gestalt principles describe how our mind organizes individual visual elements into groups, to make sense of the entire visual. When designing a visual, these principles can be used to highlight patterns that are important to us, and downplay other patterns. The image below illustrates the principles of Gestalt which are relevant to visualization (you can see a more extensive list on Wikipedia).

illustrations Read the rest of this entry »

On 1st Feb 2014, we launched a completely new website for FusionCharts after 7 months of intense work. New flat design, comprehensive demos and dashboards, a completely responsive website, zero clutter and a much more well-defined journey through the website among other things. Over a month after the launch, now that we are done fixing the bugs, optimizing the conversions and improving the experience as a whole, we thought it would a good time to give you a look behind what went into the making of what’s a fairly large B2B website with over 400 pages of content (a big part of which is our monstrous demos section).

Why a new website?

Our previous website had served us well for over two years. But over time, it picked up dust and clutter. The world was moving towards cleaner flat designs. More and more people were accessing our website from mobile phones where the experience was terrible. The performance was slow because of our legacy architecture (we were using IIS) and got even slower with all the additions we made to the website. We needed to solve all of these, and prepare for what we will need in the future.
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This is the first post in our Data Visualization Spotlight series where we showcase how different organizations are using data visualization and analytics to solve their day to day problems.

Each week, more than 245 million customers visit their 10,900 stores and 10 websites worldwide. With sales of approximately $466 billion in fiscal year 2013 and employing 2.2 million associates, Walmart is clearly a name to reckon with in the retail arena.

Walmart

At Walmart, data-driven decisions are more like a norm than an exception.  A big part of their data endeavors are based on social data—tweets, blogs, pins, comments, shares, and so on. And the task of mining all that data to generate retail-related insights rests on the team at WalmartLabs.
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